Daniele has been minsitering alongside her husband Steve for over 30 years. Together they have traveled and reached the lives of many for Christ. Her most recent message is one that divides the content between men and women. She teaches women to value their husbands or how to be your best to find a future mate. Her teachings are full of joy and practical use. She also does a teaching for men so they can learn how to become strong husbands from a woman's perspective. It's a lot of fun to be in her sessions, and you leave with a fresh perception on family and relationship.
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Physical compatibility in a relationship need not always mean love. There are many versions of love, and romance and lust are two basic ones. True love includes commitment, trust, respect and contentment. If these things lack in a relationship, it is definitely not love. A lot of people justify physical violence with passion. Passion in a relationship is definitely a natural phenomenon, but there’s a thin line between being passionate and violent. If you find your partner being too harsh on you, both physically and emotionally, then it’s not love.
The awesome LOA blogger Melody Fletcher termed the manifestations that show up to indicate we are on the right path as ‘breadcrumbs.’ The thing is though, many of us misinterpret them as ‘bad’ things that show us we still don’t have what we want. Sometimes, a manifestation is not just going to fall right into our lap—this is especially true of ‘wants’ that are really big and important to us–we typically have a lot of resistance to work through. Just allowing it in, in its full form, immediately, usually can’t happen.
If you want something to happen, such as you want a bike, don't just say I want that bike, believe you are going to get that bike. Instead of telling yourself you want the bike, envision yourself riding that bike. It doesn't matter whether or not you know when you're going to receive it, just believe you're going to get it and have no doubts about it. If you have any doubts, quickly change your thought pattern to the positive and focus on receiving or having what you want.
The New York Times best-selling author, Sandra Anne Taylor, speaks internationally on the power of consciousness and personal energy. She’s been interviewed for several national magazines, including Cosmopolitan, Family Circle, Redbook, Woman’s World, Today’s Black Woman, and Success magazine in the U.S.; and New Idea in Australia. Her books have been published in 17 languages and dozens of countries throughout the world. Sharon A. Klingler is an internationally renowned medium, speaker, and author whose published works include Intuition & Beyond, Travel into Your Past Lives, and her acclaimed home-study seminar program, Speaking to Spirit. Sharon has been featured in The London Daily Express; Now magazine (Sydney); and Eve magazine (the UK); and she has also appeared on This Morning London; Vision TV, Canada; the BBC; and on major TV and radio shows throughout the world.
Stop procrastinating. Avoiding the unpleasant parts of work doesn’t make them go away. Break the seemingly unmanageable into manageable chunks, then sprinkle those less-enjoyable aspects of a task into that other stuff that you really like. Building up a huge hunk of the bad stuff to deal with all at once, after you’ve completed the enjoyable stuff, is just going to leave a sour taste in your mouth at the end of a project.[1]
Of course, it is possible to make some broad generalizations. For starters, successful people tend to be good at what they do – although, even here, exceptions exist since some business people, for example, have been regarded as highly successful individuals while determinedly leading their companies down the road to ruin. Additionally, successful people are generally not lazy since becoming successful does require you to do something (even if turns out that you’re ultimately not that good at what that something is). I also happen to think – and it’s a controversial point – that a good dose of intelligence (even if it’s not traditional academic intelligence) does help quite a bit.
The 3% of the class that had both set written goals and created plans, were earning, on average, ten times as much as the other 97% of the class. Yes. You read that correctly. 10 times as much. This is an extraordinary difference. And other, more recent studies, have confirmed the same notion that you must set written goals with detailed plans if you want to succeed in life. 
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